Tanning is chemical a process that stabilizes the proteins, particularly collagen, of the raw hide to increase the thermal, chemical, and microbiological stability of the hides and skins, making it suitable for a wide variety of end applications. The principal difference between raw and tanned hides is that raw hides dry out to form a hard, inflexible material that, when rewetted, will putrefy, while tanned material dries to a flexible form that does not become putrid when rewetted.

Many tanning methods and materials exist. The typical process sees tanners load the hides into a drum and immerse them in a tank that contains the tanning “liquor.” The hides soak while the drum slowly rotates about its axis, and the tanning liquor slowly penetrates through the full thickness of the hide. Once the process achieves even penetration, workers slowly raise the liquor’s pH in a process called basification, which fixes the tanning material to the leather. The more tanning material fixed, the higher the leather’s hydrothermal stability and shrinkage temperature resistance.

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This week’s quick fact comes from Wikipedia
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